Posts Tagged With: Rajasthan

The Blue City: Jodhpur

The last city we visited in Rajasthan was Jodhpur, also known as the “Blue City” because of the many blue painted homes. The blue color is historically indicative of the Brahmin caste of the Hindu society, but the use of the color in modern times has spread to, well, anyone that wants to paint their house blue. Whatever the reason, it looks really cool, especially in contrast to the brown sandstone fort set high above the city.

Blue houses of Jodhpur

Blue houses of Jodhpur

During our brief two day visit we decided to finally do a proper tour of a fort. There are quite a few forts in the Indian state of Rajasthan but up until visiting the fort in Jodhpur we’d simply done a walk through on our own without a hired guide or audio-guide. As part of the admission fee in the Mehrangarh Fort an audio-guide was included. The information provided in the guide was great. It was very informative and professionally narrated. Later in our travels we found out from a fellow traveler that most of the audio tours in Rajasthan are well done. Oh well, at least we were able to experience one.

Unlike the fort in Jaisalmer, which had hotels, restaurants, and stores inside, the Mehrangarh Fort in Jodhpur could only be seen from the inside by paying an entrance fee. The fort was more of a museum. We were able to walk through the old living quarters and meeting chambers as well as view the city below from the many balconies and walls around the fort. Because the fort sits so high up from the rest of the area there are views as far as the eye can see and the haze surrounding the city will allow. As with theme parks in the U.S. there were a few actors and musicians placed throughout the grounds of the fort to help replicate the atmosphere of old. Though, the musicians would only squeak out a handful of notes in an attempt to get a donation and then stop if no donation was given.

View of the fort from the city below.

View of the fort from the city below.

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View from one of the balconies of the fort.

Enjoying the audio tour. Those circles behind me on the wall mark the spot where cannon balls hit during battle. The fort was never penetrated in its history.

Enjoying the audio tour. Those circles behind me on the wall mark the spot where cannon balls hit during battle. The fort was never penetrated in its history.

Supposedly the spot where wives of a previous ruler left their hand prints with orange paint as they left the fort to commit suicide in response to the ruler's (their husband) death.

Supposedly the spot where wives of a previous ruler left their hand prints with orange paint as they left the fort to commit suicide in response to the ruler’s (their husband) death.

Nice turban.

Nice turban.

One of the courtyards inside of the fort.

One of the courtyards inside of the fort.

Actor pretending to smoke opium from a hookah.

Actor pretending to smoke opium from a hookah.

One of several balconies used by the aristocracy to look down on the city.

One of several balconies used by the aristocracy to look down on the city.

Beautifully decorated hall.

Beautifully decorated hall.

Assembly room for the emperor and his guests.

Assembly room for the emperor and his guests.

Another courtyard. I really like the sandstone carving, especially the awnings over the windows.

Another courtyard. I really like the sandstone carving, especially the awnings over the windows.

A handful of examples of different turban rapping styles and colors.

A handful of examples of different turban rapping styles and colors.

One of the cannons collected by the army during a victory.

One of the cannons collected by the army during a victory.

Looking down on the blue city from the fort walls.

Looking down on the blue city from the fort walls.

Another cannon collected from a victorious battle.

Another cannon collected from a victorious battle.

One of the musicians squeaking out a few notes for a donation.

One of the musicians squeaking out a few notes for a donation.

Flag flying on the fort wall.

Flag flying on the fort wall.

Near the fort was the Jaswant Thada mausoleum dedicated to the past rulers of Jodhpur. On our second full day in the city we took the slightly longer walk from our hotel to the mausoleum. The main building on the premises is made of a white translucent marble. At first I thought the marble was thin enough to allow light to pass through but it turns out that the marble is pretty thick and just naturally translucent. The main building is surrounded by individual sealed chambers housing the remains of past rulers as well as a few large grassy areas. Unlike the bustling Mehrangarh Fort we’d visited the day before, the mausoleum had a fraction of the visitors. Because of this we decided to seize on the opportunity and take a rare break from the usual hustle and bustle of India and perch ourselves under a tree on the lawn outside the mausoleum.

Statue of a man and horse near the Jaswant Thada mausoleum pointing to the Mehrangarh Fort.

Statue of a man and horse near the Jaswant Thada mausoleum pointing to the Mehrangarh Fort.

Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

A painting of one of the many emperors inside of the Jaswant Thada. There was a painting of each emperor from as far back as the middle of the 13th century. Interestingly, all of the images were pretty much the same.

A painting of one of the many emperors inside of the Jaswant Thada. There was a painting of each emperor from as far back as the middle of the 13th century. Interestingly, all of the images were pretty much the same.

Front of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Front of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Front of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum

Front of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum

Tombs outside of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Tombs outside of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Relaxing on the grass outside of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum

Relaxing on the grass outside of the Jaswant Thada mausoleum

View of the city and fort from near the Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

View of the city and fort from near the Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Jaswant Thada mausoleum.

Jaswant Thada mausoleum and protective fort wall surrounding it.

The rest of our time was spent walking through the market near our hotel searching for foods we haven’t tried yet, shopping for blankets to keep us warm during train travel and just good old people watching.

I hope Sarah and I are traveling when we're the age of this couple.

I hope Sarah and I are traveling when we’re the age of this couple.

Clock tower in the center of the market in Jodhpur.

Clock tower in the center of the market in Jodhpur.

Night shot of the clock tower in Jodhpur.

Night shot of the clock tower in Jodhpur.

Famous Makhania Lassi drink. Not too bad but doesn't live up to the hype.

Famous Makhania Lassi drink. Not too bad but doesn’t live up to the hype.

Yummy omelette sandwiches for breakfast. The guy running this stand started it when he was 11, so he says, and now he's 22. He was a very happy dude.

Yummy omelette sandwiches for breakfast. The guy running this stand started it when he was 11, so he says, and now he’s 22. He was a very happy dude.

I love seeing these vendors. They remind me of the images I see of old markets in the U.S.

I love seeing these vendors. They remind me of the images I see of old markets in the U.S.

This guy was making bangles by hand to sell in his store. So much is still made by hand in India.

This guy was making bangles by hand to sell in his store. So much is still made by hand in India.

We’d traveled around India for nearly two months by the time we’d reached Jodhpur and along the way have witnessed quite a few funny animals. We’ve included some of the images in previous posts. While in Jodhpur we came across more funny animals and animal related situations than normal and captured many of them. So I decided to include them in this post for no other reason than to add a bit of humor.

Curly eared horse of Rajasthan.

Curly eared horse of Rajasthan.

Not sure how he got up there. Maybe the wall to the right. Not the safest resting place though.

Not sure how he got up there. Maybe the wall to the right. Not the safest resting place though.

This feisty goat was butting heads with the cow. The dog was observing from a safe distance.

This feisty goat was butting heads with the cow. The dog was observing from a safe distance.

It gets a little chilly in Jodhpur. By the look on his face I think the goat feels a little ridiculous.

It gets a little chilly in Jodhpur. By the look on his face I think the goat feels a little ridiculous in that sweater.

Local pack of dogs soaking up the afternoon sun.

Local pack of dogs simultaneously soaking up and hiding from the afternoon sun.

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Continuing with the theme of a previous post of mine (Ellora Caves), I will include another fun travel experience we had while in Jodhpur. Before heading to the heart of the city to find a hotel we decided to stick around the train station we’d just arrived at to try to buy train tickets for future travel.

It's hard to tell but there are two separate lines.

It’s hard to tell but there are two separate lines at the window where Sarah is standing. More people joined the line a few minutes later.

A relatively orderly looking ticket reservation area. The group to the far left was having problems creating an orderly line.

A relatively orderly looking ticket reservation area. Though, the group to the far left was having problems creating an orderly line.

Some stations have foreign ticket sales windows or even altogether separate rooms for foreign tourists. Jodhpur has a window, but that same window is for women and elderly people as well. Whenever possible we try to use the window for women because it usually has the shortest line. In this case the one window actually had two lines, one for women and the other for foreign men and elderly men, though, the two lines were not visibly distinguishable. So Sarah waited in the women’s line while I hovered behind her to defend our place in line. Defending your place in line is serious business. There are always people trying to find even the smallest space to squeeze their bodies into. My tactic usual involves making obvious gestures with my body to claim our space or even physically putting my arms between me and the window to prevent anyone from sneaking in. It’s really a fun game to play and the line cutting-perpetrators usually don’t put up a fuss if you thwart their attempts to cut into the line. I said “usually”.

While slowly making our way to the window and waiting in the somewhat orderly mixed women’s, foreign tourist’s, and elder person’s line an elderly Indian man appeared just to our side, cutting in front of everyone behind us in line. I wasn’t too concerned because Sarah was waiting in the women’s line and was clearly the next to be served at the ticket window. Nonetheless I still kept an eye on the old guy to make sure he didn’t cut in front of us. It turned out that the old man was indeed trying to not only cut in front of us but also in front of the two old men who were already at the window being served. He physically wedged his body in between the two of them but was quickly pushed back by one of the men. At first the two men began to argue with a little physical contact in the process. A little physical contact escalated to a lot with the two old men pushing and pulling one another accompanied by even more heated arguing. We obviously didn’t understand what they were saying but could tell that it wasn’t good.

We and everyone witnessing the event nearby began laughing at the absurdity of these two old guys going at it. Soon the third old dude joined the scuffle helping his partner push the line-cutting old dude back. I don’t understand how this guy thought that cutting in front of people already being helped at the window was a good idea. Did he think that the ticket teller was going to stop in the middle of serving the two men that were already there to help this other guy. On one hand, yes, because we’ve seen somewhat similar situations in India where the teller (or who ever is providing the service) helps the person who is the most assertive in a given situation. Anyway, the three men continued pushing and arguing while we continued laughing, and maintaining our place in the line of course.

After a few minutes of this they all calmed down, though, the line-cutting perp still held is ground behind them. They also came to an agreement without our involvement that Sarah would still be next in line, but the line-cutting perp did cut in front of everyone else behind us. Oh well, it’s dog eat dog at the railway ticket office I guess.

Though we were unsuccessful at getting the tickets we wanted, we were happy to have witnessed the absurd situation of the three old guys going at it. There you have it, another travel adventure from India.

Categories: Architecture, Cities, India, Ruins, Traveling | Tags: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Camel Safari and Living in an Old Fort

We had done some research ahead of time and decided that it’s going to be cheaper to do a camel safari from a small village outside of Jaisalmer called Khuri, so we decided to head there first. Jaisalmer and Khuri are the farthest west most tourist will go in India. It’s very close to the Pakistan border. Because it is so far west, you have to back track when heading anywhere else in India. So we decided to book it out west and we’ll see the things we passed on the way back. Because of this decision, we had a very long travel time.

It started with a bus from Udaipur to Jodhpur. This bus was suppose to leave around 2pm and ended up leaving around 3pm. This is completely normal, we were just concerned because we had train tickets from Jodhpur to Jaisalmer that we didn’t want to miss. The bus was in rough shape. We had fought with the guy to not get the back of the bus, but of course we ended up there. So the whole ride was bumpy and the seats were broken in the partially reclined state. Our poor necks got so sore holding our heads out for 5 hours. Anyway, the ride was long and uncomfortable to Jodhpur. We arrived pretty late there, got on a rickshaw and headed to the train station where we boarded an overnight train to Jaisalmer. We arrived 6 hours later at 5:30 am. We decided to wait inside the train station until it was day light for safety reasons. So, we left the station on foot for the bus stand to Khuri around 7 am. We never found the bus stand, but we did meet plenty of people who told us where to stand for the bus to Khuri and we got a rough estimate that the bus will arrive around 9 am. Nine came and went and someone told us it was actually 9:30 am. Well, 9:30 came and went and someone told us it was coming in 5 minutes at 9:40. The bus actually came around 10:30. We stood in the middle of no where for about 3 hours. It was great to watch all of the cars, rickshaws, cows, and people go by…

Waiting for our bus.

Waiting for our bus.

One of the many interesting things to pass us.

One of the many interesting things to pass us.

We also met a guy at the bus stop who owned a hotel in Khuri who set up camel safaris. He told us the price was the cheapest there and convinced us to get picked up by his brother and check the place out. No promises of staying there if we didn’t like it. We arrived an hour later in Khuri and were welcomed with his brother. It was a quick 5 minute walk and after looking at his place and other places we decided to stick with his place and do the camel safari that night so we wouldn’t have to sleep on the far from perfect mattresses they had there. So, after a long 24+ hour of travel we got on the back of a camel.

Camel relaxing in Khuri

Camel relaxing in Khuri

Camel drawn cart

Camel drawn cart

Kids playing in the little village of Khuri.

Kids playing in the little village of Khuri.

Camels are much larger than I thought. They are much taller than horses, for some reason this never came to mind when I wanted to get on the back of one. The height wasn’t that bad, it was the getting on and off that was a little creepy. The camels have to kneel and then lay on their legs in order for their passengers to board. They can only go up and down one side at a time, the back legs are first up and then the front. So you’re at a steep angle for the duration of the camel going up and down. Some camels are faster than others and sometimes the camel your on is tired and slower.

Camels waiting to be mounted.

Camels waiting to be mounted.

Anyway, we bumped along the back of the camel for a good 2-3 hours into the desert. Some people had the camel drivers on the back with them and others didn’t. Dave and I both had drivers with us. At one point, my driver left me alone with my camel to drive myself. Thankfully my camel was the nicest, best behaved, and thoroughly trained camel there and I had no problems. We have a funny video of me being stuck on my camel. The only thing I wasn’t taught was how to do the up and down commands to get on and off. So when we arrived at camp, everyone else is off their camel and I’m just sitting there waiting for one of the drivers to help me. We actually put this one on Youtube so you’ll all be able to laugh at me as Dave did. Click here.

Dave on his camel

Dave on his camel

Some of the local women carrying water back to their homes.

Some of the local women carrying water back to their homes.

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Camel drivers ride in the back. Apparently camels can carry 3 people no problem as long as they are healthy.

Camel drivers ride in the back. Apparently camels can carry 3 people no problem as long as they are healthy.

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This camel driver owned both of these camels.

This camel driver owned both of these camels.

He was peeing, that is why I was standing so far away.

He was peeing, that is why I was standing so far away.

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They sure are goofy looking. The camels only, I mean...

They sure are goofy looking. The camels only, I mean…

Wild mom and baby camel.

Wild mom and baby camel.

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At camp, the drivers made two separate fires, one for the tourists and one for them to do most of the cooking on. We got to relax and watch the sunset while the drivers prepared dinner. Some of the people on the safari with us had paid extra for chicken. The chicken was thoroughly cooked over our fire with bonus seasoning of sand and coals, I’m glad Dave and I didn’t pay extra for that. The food was good considering we were in the middle of a desert-we had chapati, rice, vegetable curry and a lentil curry. Very tasty. We had some good conversation with the other tourists on the safari over the camp fire. We talked for many hours then we decided to hit the sand. Literally. We slept on a blanket on the sand with another blanket over us. It was a good experience. We were mostly freaked out that the camels would walked over us during the night since they were free to roam and did so very close to our fires and beds prior to us being in them.

Khuri Panoramic_01

Hungry camel

Hungry camel

Our camp.

Our camp.

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Drivers getting ready to cook.

Drivers getting ready to cook.

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Chicken.

Chicken.

The bedroom at camp.

The bedroom at camp.

Sunset and sunrise!

Sunset and sunrise!

Chilly morning, didn't want to get out of bed.

Chilly morning, didn’t want to get out of bed.

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Good news, no one got trampled over the night. The drivers cooked breakfast for us, which was pretty pathetic. It consisted of tea and chapati. Not very filling. Dave and I brought cookies we didn’t eat the day before so we had cookies for breakfast too. Not sure why mom doesn’t think that’s a good breakfast…

Anyway, another short bump back to the hotel and the whole thing was done. Short and sweet. It was a perfect amount of time on a camel as they are not the most comfortable things to ride and sleeping in the sand is also not the most comfortable thing.

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This guy was not part of our group. Check out his sweet turbine.

This guy was not part of our group. Check out his sweet turban.

Another big reason it was the perfect amount of time for me was because one of the camels was in heat. I know heat isn’t the correct term because it was a male camel, but he was in the mind set of attracting and finding a female camel to mate with. This consisted of foaming at the mouth and ballooning this large and very disgusting sac from the side of the camel mouth. This wouldn’t have been so bad, but the camel belonged to the same camel driver as my camel. So the mate attracting camel rode right next to my face the whole time. Anytime the camel needed to move away from a tree the foamy, stinky mouth was inches from my face. Also, at one point, the gross sac that comes out the side of the mouth ballooned inches from my face. I winced and the camel driver put his hand between my face and the sac until the camel decided to suck it back in. But, “don’t worry Sarah, he won’t bite” was my assurance from the camel driver. HA. Like I was concerned with that. I was focused on not getting foam on my clothes or in my mouth and to not get slapped in the face with a mating sac. Yup, definitely the perfect amount of time.

Inches from my face...

Inches from my face…

We couldn’t get a picture of the sac, but i borrowed this one from the web.

After the camel safari, we headed back to Jaisalmer and into the fort. Jaisalmer is one of the few, if not the only, places you can stay inside the fort. It was very awesome to be inside the fort the whole time. We noticed here that the people are more friendly than we’ve experienced in other places of India. We had many conversations with locals who owned shops, hotels, or restaurants and just wanted to talk rather than talk to make the sale. It was nice. We spent a good hour or longer in a jewelry shop talking to the owner sharing stories about the different cultures. He even gave us some of his cadbury chocolate. We didn’t buy the ring his shop is famous for, but he didn’t seem to mind just hanging out. This was our second stop in Rajasthan and we can tell from interacting with the people why it is such a popular tourist area in India. It was a fun place to spend a couple of nights.

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Dave outside our hotel.

Dave outside our hotel.

Inside the fort

Inside the fort

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Mind your head. We come across these all the time. Never stops being funny.

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Washing clothes in a bucket. We hate doing it, but it's a must.

Washing clothes in a bucket. We hate doing it, but it’s a must.

Dave also hates doing it. Travel size washing machine anyone??

Dave also hates doing it. Travel size washing machine anyone??

From the fort looking into the golden city.

From the fort looking over the golden city.

Categories: Cities, India, Nature, Outdoors, Ruins, Traveling | Tags: , , , , | 2 Comments

Cooking Class and a Suit in Udaipur

Udaipur was our introduction to what is probably India’s most popular state for travelers, Rajasthan. Here is where you’ll find women wearing beautiful jewelry on nearly every part of their bodies not covered by sarees, men wearing colorful turbans, camels, deserts and beautiful stone palaces and forts. Before heading to Udaipur we hadn’t done much research and made our decision to visit partly out of necessity. Our goal was to head straight to Jodhpur, which would have had us skipping Udaipur. Fortunately for us there are no buses directly from Mumbai to Jodhpur. So a stop in Udaipur was necessary at least to make onward travel to Jodhpur. We figured we’d give the city at least a day to impress us and move on quickly if it didn’t. And well, it turned out that Udaipur was definitely worth more than just a day’s visit.

Udaipur Panoramic_03

Udaipur Panoramic_02

The narrow winding streets and proximity to water reminded me a bit of Varanasi. It’s referred to in our guidebook as the Venice of India because of the many buildings built right on the water’s edge. In fact, at least two palaces were built on two separate islands completely covering every square inch of them, to the extent that the walls of the palaces are in the water. Despite it’s similarities with other places in India we’d been to we observed it to be a much friendlier place to visit. Not that we’d encountered unfriendly people elsewhere, we just had far more friendly and genuine conversations with people in Udaipur than elsewhere up to that point. This characteristic seemed to hold true for every place we visited in Rajasthan after Udaipur.

After deciding to spend more time in Udaipur we then decided to partake in a couple of fun experiences beyond the usual sightseeing, though, we still did our share of sightseeing. We decided to finally take a long anticipated cooking class so that we could bring some our favorite Indian food recipes home. The other experience involved no forethought at all and only came about because, well, it was just such a good deal I had to do it. While walking around the city we saw several custom clothing shops and decided to stop in to see just what kind of service they could provide. We were quickly impressed by their craftsmanship and I decided that this was a good opportunity to get a suit custom made to fit my lanky frame. Only other skinny fellas can appreciate just how difficult it is to get a suit that fits properly. And having one made in India meant I’d pay far less than for the same thing back home. Plus, India is full of skilled craftsman hand making many of the things we’ve long outsourced in the U.S. So I had some faith that the quality would meet my satisfaction.

Here are some pictures of the sightseeing we did in Udaipur, including a boat tour.

Sarah found the cooking class offered by a woman named Shashi by researching reviews on TripAdvisor (TripAdvisor has turned out to be a great resource for reviewing all kinds of traveler oriented needs, e.g. hotels and tours) and recommendations in the guidebook. The good reviews turned out to be true and Shashi delivered a great experience. She was a confident, feisty woman in her early to mid 50’s. Hearing the story of how offering these classes has drastically improved her quality of life by providing a stable and good source of income compared to her limited options beforehand made the experience even better. She also shared how the idea to create the class came from a tourist she made meals for and hosted at her home a few years back. And since then other tourists have helped her draft an easy to understand recipe book (which is included with each class) in multiple languages and one tourist even built her a website. She loves what she does and genuinely appreciates the help she’s been given by tourists. She was proud to announce that she is the number one ranked activity/attraction in Udaipur on TripAdvisor, outranking even the city’s architectural attractions, including the City Palace.

The class lasted about 4 hours. In the class with us were a young German couple. Together we all helped Shashi make a full dinner including, masala chai (tea with spices), vegetable and cheese pakora (battered and deep fried fritters), Aloo Ghobi masala (sautéed potatoes and cauliflower with a mix of spices), Vegetable Pulao (sautéed rice and mixed veggies with cashews and raisins), a few types of breads called Chapati, Paratha and Naan (minus a tandoori oven), and mint and mango chutni (dipping sauces). At the end of the cooking course we overindulged in the fruits of our labor and even had enough to take home to eat for breakfast the next day.

Below is a gallery of the cooking class.

The purchase of the suit was not an easy decision to make. Doing so would involve spending a bit more money than I had planned spending on any kind of souvenir for myself and also meant I’d either have to ship it home or carry the rest of the trip with me. Despite these concerns I decided to go for it and have a custom suit made. Besides, this will likely be the only time in my life that I have a custom suit made.

The turnaround time for the suit was impressive. After the initial measurements it only took the tailor a little over a full day to produce a finished suit and jacket. Upon first trying it on I was very happy. So happy that I overlooked slight fitting issue with the jacket. Thankfully Sarah saw it and pointed it out to me. The shop owner guaranteed that I would be happy with the fit even if it meant making some changes to the suit. So the owner, Sarah and I jumped on his scooter and drove to his brother’s shop a few minutes away. The brother checked out the issue and promised to deliver the suit the next evening. This was good because we needed to catch a bus the following morning.

The next evening we returned to the shop to check to see if the fit had improved. Much to our disappointed it had not changed much at all. Sarah and I, and the owner as well were a little flustered by the whole thing. For us it meant spending at least an extra morning in Udaipur. For the shop owner it meant having the tailor do another costly alteration to the suit causing delays in other work he had promised to do for other customers. After another drive and a lot of insisting on my and Sarah’s part that the change be made, the tailor reluctantly to make the changes that night and have the jacket ready to pick up the follow morning in time for us to catch the afternoon bus. The owner promised to return my deposit if the jacket did not fit properly.

The next morning we arrived expecting to not see much difference because the first alteration the tailor made didn’t produce much change in the fit of the jacket. Thankfully we were wrong. The fit was improved and we were finally satisfied with the suit. With the thirty minutes we had left before having to leave to catch our bus we helped the shop owner create a business profile on TripAdvisor as a little special extra thanks for doing what needed to be done to make sure we were happy with the suit. And then off to Jodhpur we headed.

Sarah waiting for our late night train to Jaisalmer.

Sarah waiting for our late night train to Jaisalmer.

Sleeping attendant at the train station waiting room.

Sleeping attendant at the train station waiting room.

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Train station in Jodhpur.

Train station in Jodhpur.

Not so comfortable bus to Jodhpur.

Not so comfortable bus to Jodhpur.

Categories: Architecture, Cities, India, Traveling | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

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